About your Search

20121208
20121208
STATION
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 2
MSNBCW 2
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
SFGTV2 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day and probably all night. we are very much family dependent to achieve as much as we can in the summit. i hope that we will be able to have another commitment perido -- period under the kyoto protocol. i hope as wel
of pigsticking making headlines in spain. property rises in germany are leaving some without a home. and mistaken identities in poland's presidential plane crash. there's something rather medieval in the idea of a sport where men on horseback chase while boris with spears. it is an archaic sport, once hugely popular in spain. then it was banned, but now it is making a comeback. this traditional hunting method is being legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned,
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
of germany from '85 to '89 and before that worked as a state department as assistant secretary of state for european and can nad yain affairs. and before that was the drecker of political military affairs in the department of state. so he along with his colleagues has a long and imminent involvement in the issues. and finally, left side but not least, ambassador mat lock known to many of us retired foreign service officer. he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all since '91. during the 35 years in the foreign service he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1978 to 1991 as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior directer for european and sowf yet affairs on the national security staff from '83 to '86. as ambassador of czech from '81 to '83. i won't go over the imminent and long career in the interest of time. i wanted to give you a brief recap for all three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox
, and then a continuing continuum to germany and back to the states in the c130's, the flying icu's which the air force has, which you are safer in the air at 30,000 feet than you are in 90 percent of the icu's in this country. they do not lose patients over the atlantic. they do not lose patients over the pacific and, remember, they transport them within days, days, of them being critically injured. the patient will wake up for the first time in a hospital in the states. that is often the first time they wake up. that's how fast the medevac system goes. wouldn't it be a shame to waste that compartment of skills on a mass casualty event that occurs here. well, we have hospitals and they're going to be okay and we have a robust provider system, and you do, one that the cities and counties and states should be proud of. because they get it. they get it out here. but the hospitals, they will have to figure it out. but what if you are a country and all of a sudden you have an earthquake and by the way the one thing you need most because of that earthquake, the hospital infrastructure, is gone. can
of the past. for them, correcting the injustice was more important than making germany a better country. unfortunately, we see similar tendency among many revolutionary guard. they no longer have a religious base the same way the clerics have but are using terror in order to control the population, particularly they're fond of show trials. staliniist show trials. we have people who are the rulers of iran in he 1980s, who today themselves have been slaves to the system. they show up at trials, and they confess being agents for the cia , mousad, and of course no one believes. no one. not a subject iranian believes these people, who served the revolution have completely become counterrevolutionary. but the idea is to look into the hearts of the iranian public, telling them that the chosen prime minister of khomeini, if he is not -- if he has to appear on short trial, if people who were cabinet ministers in the 1980s have to an short trial. this this change which is taking place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, i wanted to move on to you, in light of what marina said about the indifference she fel
with 40% of its economy. we have the advantage over china and we're more productive than germany and japan. it has to do with the free market entrepreneur where we value the assembly line and they're innovating and customizing product. >> six times the productive over china in the united states. that keeps us on par in terms of our output. that being said, 1979 you note in the book at peak we're what, amine, significant number of jobs. now we're down to 11-plus million jobs. how do we change that trendline? >> well, it's a challenge. the biggest challenge is the jobs that are in manufacturing now require higher kills. we need to have our community colleges preparing people to have the credentialing to have the operating cnc machines, operating programming skills that are going to be required for modern manufacturing workforce. these jobs are more competitive and they require more skill. i think that's one of the big challenges. >> gavin: so you value manufacturing why? why is it so important that we produce things? why not in a globalized world just go for the cheapest product to reduce th
. she has stage four cancer. we have to go. get her to 250,000. before she goes to germany for more treatment. there is an election in louisiana.
you know that we still have troops in germany? last i checked that war ended three years ago. we don't need them there anymore. leave, leave, leave. >> three years ago. >> i know my history. >> you do. let's be honest here. this is not an uh anomaly. somebody tell me what anomaly means. >> that is psy's wife. >> killer mic, rapper winning all of these accolades and end of the year awards and best of the year list rapper. his big song all i keep saying is i am glad regan is dead. nobody cares if you crap on america or crap on american icons. remember" cop killer"? >> are you comparing apples and oranges. koreans are nuts, and their culture of protesting is like a fashion show. when rappers do it that's a whole different ball of wax. american rapper does it to say i hate this country. i hate white people. >> even if they are doing it to be cool, this would not be him doing a rap anti-gay marriage. it is never going to be hip. >> you know what he should do. >> to be christian or pro american which is why those are always tendencies is they have to be the hip ones. i think he should get
, in germany, not only los angeles in the states but it is happening in a lot of programs inspired by sistema, it is only to help that, you know, to develop the idea of music as a human right. >> rose: yes. >> it is a -- well, like this guy is talking about something really crazy. but i think art has to be an element of society, to be better citizens, to be a better human beings, we are not talking about something new. wwe can go back, you know, in times, you know, when art was an element, an essential element of the men. and that is something that we need in this -- >> rose: it speaks to who we are and what we want to become. >> exactly. especially in in very cultivated world where -- >> rose: yeah. >> where we have to build something better, something more sensible for -- >> rose: when you accepted the job at the la philharmonic, why there? >> one of my first commitments was at los angeles, after i won the competition,. i remember invited me. >> rose: the then conductor. >> exactly. the music director at that time. and in 2005 i went there and the second time was in 2006 i was conducting ba
. >>> and in germany, check it out, around 400 santas gathered to surprise travelers in a train station. hot shots, pictures coming in from around the world. >>> authorities in nebraska didn't have much trouble tracking down an alleged bank robber. and thanks to the suspect, prosecutors shouldn't have a hard time making their case. jeanne moos shows us why. >> reporter: note to accused bank robbers, doesn't help your case to post your self-on youtube waving around cash and holding a sign saying, i robbed a bank, while the band green day blares appropriate lyrics. ♪ i don't need your authority >> reporter: and you might want to reconsider titling your video, chick bank robber. 19-year-old hannah sabata was arrested one day after the cornerstone bank in waco, nebraska, was robbed. according to sheriff dale radcliffe who had to keep a grip on sabata as she jerked away -- >> no gun was ever shown inside the bank. she just said she had a gun with her, the note said she had a gun. >> reporter: the suspect seems to like writing notes. like the one that said, then i stole a car. and indeed a stolen car
expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commi
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses music is a universal language. but i was worried theaccident... health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my carmay cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. ♪musicú ♪the more i search0forú my significance,♪ ♪seems0r ♪and0i0ú a0difference♪ ♪in anyú i've been0here♪ ♪and0i0ú laughter♪ ♪it's tp i've ever knownp♪ ♪i0don'ú happensp♪ ♪but i0e ♪and0i0u ♪and0afú sometimes0i0
voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
-distance transportation options. we did catch up to germany, france and japan. just heard this morning cioppino celebrating the 50th anniversary of their bullet train. we cannot allow china to surpass us in our next generation of infrastructure. tourists across the world will visit our high-speed rail to marvel at our civic engineering and technological prowess. this is not just at a transportation company changing the revitalization along the cities along the route. in conclusion, it is clear support the high-speed rail california. the federal program will help make it possible. what we need now is fishing. but we need now is leadership. what we need now is believed that the people of california in this country want us to invest in this type of transportation option. thank you, mr. chairman. i yield back. >> i think most of the members for joining us. welcome to join us if you think kiefer questions. we'll excuse you at this time as we bring secretary of the hood of who is witness. our second panelist is the secretary of transportation, former member of this panel from a distinguished secretar
in washington post regarding medical costs and they have for example appendectomy costs $13,000 but in germany, 3,100, you would think that you would think it is government run so is subsidized but yet they spend 11% of gnp while we spend 17.5%. how do you explain the discrepancy? >> guest: great question. they have a somewhat controlled system over there which i have no doubt has good outcomes knowing germans fidelity to quality and engineering and expectations, we don't have competition. if you read marty makary's book he will find out the reasons why things cost. often times one of the points he makes, we often have physicians with great reputations who all the doctors know are the worst doctors so the question is about having transparency. the third thing is they don't have the court system we have which is tremendously expensive. in my last few years of practice it was costing me $1,000 or $2,000 a day in terms of malpractice costs for baby. that was fully absorber cost so they don't have that, they don't have the rules and regulations we have. there's a lot to be said about what the germ
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17